The 3 Best Strategies to Reduce Teacher Turnover

admin | September 9, 2019

According to a recent report from the Texas Education Agency, nearly one in three public school teachers in Texas quit before reaching their sixth school year.

Texas has roughly 350,000 public school teachers and every year, 10% of them leave their job. In recent years, Dallas ISD has lost as many as 20%.[1]

Teacher turnover has a cascading impact on our school districts, disrupting student education, straining hairline budgets with replacement efforts and placing even more pressure on staff left behind. While the challenge goes back decades, the solutions are new — and we think they hold the key to reducing teacher turnover in 2020.

 

#3 Put an end to the supply scramble

–and teacher’s personal debt. It’s been reported that 94% of teachers spend their own money on school supplies.[2] We don’t have to tell you how financially burdensome that can be, nor how it contributes to early burnout. Innovative school districts have begun adopting creative ways to reduce supply spend on teachers by opening free supply stores on site.

These schools have partnered with local organizations to collect materials driven by teacher wish lists. Adopt a Classroom brings this collaboration to life online, allowing teachers to create wish lists and connecting them to individual donors. Other districts have kept on-site supply stores stocked through supply drives in partnership with PTOs and PTAs.

 

#2 Develop future educators

–the way they want to be developed. Millennials are the largest generation in the U.S. workforce, yet interest in teaching as a profession is dropping. Over the past five years, enrollment in teacher preparation programs has fallen nearly 35%.[3] That’s no surprise when you consider the top career priorities of the millennial include salary, stress level, and upward mobility. Too often in the education profession, the first year on the job is much like the fifth or even the tenth.

Microcredentialing is a growing trend to help districts better manage and reward the skills teachers have mastered, like classroom management or analyzing student data. This strategy, which diverts from traditional workshops, provides educators the opportunity to make more money, earn deserved recognition, and apply for leadership opportunities.

 

#1 Live Up to Teachers’ Expectations of House Bill 3

In May, Texas lawmakers passed a landmark $11.6 billion House Bill that overhauled the state’s outdated school funding system. Under HB 3, districts are to use a portion of the new money on employee raises and benefits. While there’s no official directive to follow (the state is largely leaving it up to the districts), teachers who fought for the bill’s passing are hoping for a raise of 6% or more.

Given that Texas teacher’s make roughly $7,000 less than the national average and haven’t had a raise in 20 years, that’s not an unrealistic request. How districts will provide long overdue raises and quality benefits is another issue — one that has been solved by health plans built on high-performance networks.

These health plans take a less-is-more approach, carving out redundant or over-priced services and carving in high-quality, local physicians with a history of delivering positive patient outcomes.

The result is a cost savings of 20-30%.

These new approaches are already producing positive outcomes for school districts in reducing teacher turnover, but to see the results by 2020 leaders in education must start now. Read our deep analysis of the current retention crisis facing ISDs and practical, powerful solutions.

 

Teacher Retention 101: Best Practices for School Districts


REFERENCES

[1] https://tea.texas.gov/Reports_and_Data/Educator_Data/Educator_Reports_and_Data/

[2] https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/15/politics/teachers-school-supplies-spending/index.html

[3] https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/sites/default/files/product-files/A_Coming_Crisis_in_Teaching_REPORT.pdf


Chris_Wilson_Senior Vice President of Health Plan for Healthcare Highways

 

CHRIS WILSON | Senior Vice President of Business Development, Healthcare Highways Mr. Wilson brought his experiences founding brokerage firm CJW & associates, LLC and serving as Senior Producer for Arthur J. Gallagher to the role of Vice President of Sales for Healthcare Highways. Now Senior Vice President of Health Plans of Healthcare Highways, Inc. his dedication to excellence has proven invaluable.